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ICC Canada President Claims Partial Victory at Nairobi Climate Change Talks

Inuvik – Tuesday, 21 November 2006

After international climate change negotiations
wound up last week, and as ministers from around the world returned to their respective
countries, Duane Smith, the President of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada),
expressed his disappointment that the Canadian government did not stand in solidarity
with other nation states in committing itself to the emission reduction targets established
under the Kyoto Protocol.

Mr. Smith said that he was pleased that over 100 ministers present in Nairobi adopted the
“Nairobi Framework”. The Framework will help developing countries participate in the
Kyoto Protocol and financially assist them in adapting to the effects of the changing
climate. He especially applauds Canada’s role in concluding the “five-year adaptation
program”, and urges Canada to move forward on a national adaptation strategy in
consultation with Inuit. He is less than satisfied with Canada’s other input to this 12th

Conference of the Parties of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP
12).

Mr. Smith stated, “while I am encouraged that Rona Ambrose, Canada’s Minster of
Environment, recognized in her speech that the Arctic is a vulnerable region when it
comes to climate change, and that Inuit will require unique adaptation interventions, I am
still disappointed that the government continues to insist it is reasonable to wait until
2050 before we see any real impact on our melting homeland – the Arctic”.

“I am glad that the global community is helping other peoples, such as those in Africa
and in the small island states that will be partially flooded. But where is Canada on
reversing the trend? And why are they not working more closely with those of us who are
most affected?” questioned Smith.

Mr. Smith made these comments in Canada after reading the text of Ms. Ambrose’s
speech back in Canada because the new government’s funding restrictions made it
virtually impossible for him to be in Nairobi. “I call upon the Canadian government to
help us help them in this urgent matter of climate change.” He noted that it is important  2
for Inuit to be well prepared for next year’s COP 13. ICC hopes the Canadian
government will recognize that it needs to be full partners with Inuit in taking on this
enormous challenge and that it will be more welcoming and financially supportive of ICC
as COP 13 approaches.

Contact:

Corinne Gray, ICC Canada Executive Director
cgray@inuitcircumpolar.com
tel: +1 613 563 2642

or

Stephanie Meakin, ICC Canada Science Advisor
smeakin@ripnet.com
tel: +1 613 258 9470

INUIT CIRCUMPOLAR COUNCIL
CANADA OFFICE
170 Laurier Avenue W., Suite 504
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1P 5V5
Tel: 613-563-2642 Fax: 613-565-3089
https://www.inuitcircumpolar.com email: icc@inuitcircumpolar.com

The Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) is an Indigenous Peoples’ Organization (IPO), founded in 1977 to promote and celebrate the unity of 180,000 Inuit from Alaska (USA), Canada, Greenland, and Chukotka (Russia). ICC works to promote Inuit rights, safeguard the Arctic environment, and protect and promote the Inuit way of life. In regard to climate change, we believe that it is crucial for world leaders and governments to recognize, respect and fully implement the human rights of Inuit and all other Indigenous peoples across the globe.